The Secrets of 14th Century Wall Painting in the Western Himalayas: Structural Damage Sheds Light Onto the Painting Technique
in the Tsuglag-khang in Kanji in Ladakh

with Alexandra Skedzuhn, Martina Oeter, and Christine Bläuer

To this joint article focusing on the painting technique I have contributed the description of the art historical content of the monument. The article will be published with the Austrian Academy of Science.

A Vajradhātu Mandala in a Prajñāpāramitā Manuscript of Tabo Monastery

with Eva Allinger

This article first summarizes the manuscript illuminations found at Tabo Monastery, Spiti, Himachal Pradesh, India, and then focuses on one fragmented manuscript featuring the deities of the Vajradhātu mandala and its comparisons. I hope that this thorough study of the Tabo corpus in comparison to murals in the western Himalayas once and for all clarifies that early western Himalayan manuscript illuminations spread over several centuries and only some of them are as early as the 11th century.

The article will be published by the Austrian Academy of Sciences.

Wanla

A long term project done in cooperation with Holger Neuwirth and his team at the Technical University of Graz as well as in collaboration with Achi Association is a comprehensive documentation of the three-storied temple of Wanla. The publication aims at documenting and analyzing the art and architecture of the temple and set place its features into context. Wanla turns out to be one of the most important surviving temples in the Western Himalayas.

Sumda Chung

With Sumda Chung another important project in cooperation with Holger Neuwirth and team awaits attention. Since a research travel in autumn 2005, financed by Holger's FWF project, and thanks to the support of the local Gönpa Society, we do have a comprehensive documentation of the temples of Sumda Chung. Once Wanla is done, I hope we can focus on this site as well.

Mirror of the Buddha – Early Portraits from Tibet

A short article that was meant to introduce an exhibition of the same name curated by David Jackson for the Rubin Museum of Art, which was on view October 21, 2011 to March 5, 2012. In this text I focus on the adoption of iconographic signifiers of enlightenment in early portraits of some Kagyü Schools.

This article should have been published in the winter 2011/2012 issue of the Eastern Art Report, but for unknown reasons never was. I have not yet decided what to do with it now.